Small Action, Big Change Challenge

Small Actions Big Change challenge

Youth Forum challenge programming

How to complete the challenge

This challenge is divided into four sections – Understanding Advocacy, Environmental Action, Identity Advocacy and Wellness Advocacy. Under each of these categories, there are four to five activities units can choose to complete. Units must complete one or two activities under each category (four to eight in total) to be eligible for a crest. Purchase crests. This challenge is available until December 31. The challenge and crest were developed by the Ontario/Nunavut Youth Forum.

Part 1: Understanding Advocacy

Part 1 is divided into three subcategories – Community and Allyship, Political Advocacy, and Digital Advocacy. Units can choose one to two activities from any of the three subcategories to complete the activity (e.g., A Brownie unit can choose to complete the Drawing for your Values and She’s a Politician to complete this section).

Community and Allyship

Sparks and Brownies

  1. Drawing for Your Values
    Colouring sheet of topics to advocate for – the earth, equality – anything.
  2. Reflect on your Action
    Reflect on a time you made a positive change in your community.
  3. The Curious Visitor
    Pack Alien Zorp a suitcase with what children need to live happy lives, and sort them into needs and wants.
  4. What is a Leader?
    There are all different types of leaders and tons of things about you that can help you to be a leader in your life. Can you show what it means to be a leader? Listen carefully to the describing word, then rush to the “Yes” or “No” sign to show what you think makes someone a good leader.

Guides

  1. Drawing for Your Values
    Draw a poster around what you advocate for – the earth, equality – anything. Make pre-made sheets for younger girls.
  2. Reflect on Your Action
    Reflect on a time you made a positive change in your community.
  3. Plot Your Spot
    Plot your spot on how much you agree/disagree with each statement, state your opinions/reasoning, and connect the statements to rights in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).

Pathfinders and Rangers

  1. Drawing for Your Values
    Draw a poster around what you advocate for – the earth, equality – anything. Make pre-made sheets for younger girls.
  2. Reflect on Your Action
    Reflect on a time you made a positive change in your community.

Political Advocacy

Sparks and Brownies

  1. She’s a Politician!
    Learn about what politicians do by discussing it in your unit and inviting a female politician to discuss her role. Sheet for first activity should be edited to match different groups

Guides

  1. She’s a Politician!
    Learn about what politicians do by discussing it in your unit and inviting a female politician to discuss her role. The sheet for first the activity should be edited to match different groups
  2. Mascot Candidates
    Create a mascot for your unit and learn to campaign. Whoever gets the most votes wins!

Pathfinders and Rangers

  1. She’s a Politician!
    Learn about what politicians do by discussing it in your unit and inviting a female politician to discuss her role. The sheet for the first activity should be edited to match different groups.

Digital Advocacy

Visit Kids Help Phone if you need resources to discuss bullying/cyberbullying.

Sparks and Brownies

  1. Digitally Prepared
    Since more of our school activities are online, many of us had to learn to speak up for ourselves digitally. Ask the group to come up with ideas to stay safe and advocate for yourself when you are online.

    Ideas might include:
    • Make sure your parents know what you are doing online
    • Never share your information with someone you don't know
    • Don't sign up for anything without asking your parents
    • Be nice to other people when you are online
    • If someone is being mean, ask them to stop or ask an adult for help

Guides

  1. Build a Platform
    What would you want in a platform made for Guides? On the computer or on paper, create a homepage for your ideal social media that you could be an advocate for.

Pathfinders and Rangers

  1. Social Media in the Unit
    How does your unit use social media? Make a hashtag for your unit and learn about how you can use social media to advocate for issues you’re passionate about.

Part 2: Environmental Action

In part 2, each branch has a grouping of activities they can complete. Units can choose one or two activities for their age group or they can plan and host a plastic-free party to complete the section.

Sparks and Brownies: The Ultimate Environmental Activity Combo

  1. Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup
    In association with OceanWise and WWF, clean up your local shoreline or nature space with your unit or on your own.
  2. Clean-up scavenger hunt
    Interactive cleanup activity using this scavenger hunt list.
  3. Litter Life Span
    Discussion and activity about decomposition of different types of waste.
  4. Upcycle Spy
    Using waste found in the previous cleanup activity(ies) or recycled materials from your own home, create a eye-spy jar with water, sand, sparkles, waste, etc. share with your friends!
  5. Plastic free party
    Plan a party that has no plastic.

Guides: One Person’s Trash is Another Plant’s Habitat

  1. Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup
    In association with OceanWise and WWF, clean up your local shoreline or nature space with your unit or on your own.
  2. Dirty Dozen
    In this fun game, discover the top 12 shoreline trash and their decomposition rates.
  3. Shoreline Scavenger hunt
    Interactive cleanup activity using this scavenger hunt list.
  4. Amazing aquaponics
    Using waste found in the previous cleanup activity(ies) or recycled materials from your own home, create a self-watering plant pot.
  5. Plastic free party
    Plan a party that has no plastic.

Pathfinders and Rangers: Trash-ionista

  1. Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup
    In association with OceanWise and WWF, clean up your local shoreline or nature space with your unit or on your own.
  2. Fast Fashion showdown
    Learn about the fast fashion industry in this Price-is-right-style game (see these sample questions).
  3. Upcycle your style
    Using waste found in the previous cleanup activity(ies) or recycled materials from your own home, make sustainable bangles to upgrade your style without buying from fast fashion.
  4. Plastic free party
    Plan a party that has no plastic.

Part 3: Identity Advocacy

In part 3, each branch has a grouping of activities they can complete. Units can choose one or two activities for their age group.

Sparks and Brownies

  1. Colour Your Identity
    Similar to the activity on the platform – Spark/Brownie Portrait | Guide Portrait | Pathfinder/Ranger Portrait

    Draw a picture of yourself that describes who you are and your personal identity. You can use the drawing page or ask to create their own drawing to reflect this. Think about things like: My family, My culture, My language(s) , My abilities (things I do well and things I can’t do), My traditions, Who I am (daughter, sister, baseball player, dancer).

    For Pathfinders and Rangers this can expand to include reflection on or discussion of their own identity including personal pronouns, sexual, gender, racial, cultural and disability identities. Follow up discussion in a group: Invite participants to share pages with each other if they are comfortable. Discussion should be optional.

    Guiders should monitor to make sure all discussions stay positive and that no one feels left out or discriminated against.

  2. Confidence Cookies
    Write a different thing about yourself on each paper cookie and keep them in your cookie box so you can pull one out the next time you need a confidence boost.
  3. Raise Your Voice
    In this loud and energizing group activity you’ll see just how powerful you can be when everyone uses their voice to share the same message!
  4. A Better World, By Girls
    Create a mural of the different ways you want to make a difference and see how your impact grows and grows with every Girl’s addition.
  5. I Spy… Accessibility
    In this activity, you’ll try to spot the obstacles that stop some people from having fun at the park. We would like there to be more scenes, e.g., one with a crosswalk, or one with a store front.
  6. I Heart Myself
    In this crafty movement activity, give your body heart hugs to show it you care about it and the things it can do.
  7. Additional activity: Have girls put an elastic around their index finder and thumb, then try to button something up or identify coins with your eyes closed.

Guides

  1. Colour your identity (see Sparks and Brownies, #1, for explanation)
  2. Confidence Cookies
    Write a different thing about yourself on each paper cookie and keep them in your cookie box so you can pull one out the next time you need a confidence boost.
  3. Working Towards Equity
    One goal of feminism is to create gender equity. If the world had gender equity, it would mean that all people are treated fairly and given what they need, regardless of their gender identity.
  4. Being Inclusive: Foundation Stations
    You might have heard these three words a lot lately; diversity, equity and inclusion. What do they actually mean?
  5. On a Roll
    There are so many things that make you unique! Get on a roll and see how many different things you can share about yourself and the things you like to do. In this quick action die-rolling game, you’ll share different things about you depending on the number you roll.

If needed, switch up the prompts: 

    • Roll b 1 – What is one word you’d use to describe yourself?
    • Roll b 2 – What is one of your pet peeves? 
    • Roll b 3 – What qualities do you look for in friends? 
    • Roll b 4 – What is your favourite personality trait about yourself?
    • Roll b 5 – What is an interesting food you’ve had that you think other people should try?
    • Roll b 6 – What is your favourite colour? 

Pathfinders and Rangers

  1. Colour your identity (see Sparks and Brownies, #1, for explanation)
  2. Confidence Cookies
    Write a different thing about yourself on each paper cookie and keep them in your cookie box so you can pull one out the next time you need a confidence boost.
  3. Growing Acceptance
    People and communities all over the world are growing more accepting of difference and diversity. While progress may be slow, laws and policies are beginning to change to respect the basic human rights of those who identify as part of the LGBTQ2S+ community. Explore this evolution through a hands-on trivia game!

    Make sure to have discussions with your group prior and after doing the trivia on why acceptance is important.
    • Is there anything that came up in the activity that you want to talk more about?
    • What other policies and laws could be changed that affect the human rights of people who identify as LGBTQ2S+?
  4. (In)visible Identities
    In this activity, you’ll explore visible and invisible identities and discuss some of the challenges people can face based on each type of identity. This discussion is meant to go deep – check out “Tips, tricks and more” for important information on how to run it in a meaningful, sensitive way.
  5. Media Values
    What are girls and women like on earth? What if a researcher from another planet only collected data from magazines and movies to draw their conclusions?

Before you start this activity - Discuss with your group about unrealistic beauty standards in the media. Have an open discussion. Reference the “stuff you can talk about” section on Girls First 

Possible activities to include that are not part of GGC Programming: 

  1. Discussion: Share something that is unique about yourself? How does this make you YOU? (for younger age groups).
  2. Activity: Identity red flags → For all of the statements below, identify whether they are red flags or not. This activity can be modified to be individual, collaborative, in person or online. If played in person, a moderator should be present to ensure that all discussions stay respectful (for Pathfinders/Rangers) .
  • Red Flag = something to look out for - use caution 
  • Deal Breaker = a complete deal breaker 
  • No Biggie = its fine either way

Possible prompt ideas: 

Ask: Is [Prompt] a Red Flag, Deal Breaker or No Biggie.

  • Someone not respecting someone else's pronouns.
  • Someone not having the same favourite food as you.
  • Someone not agreeing with another's core values.
  • If your friend has a different favourite colour.
  • A friend not liking your other friend’s hobby. 
  • Someone acting distant when you tell them something important about you.
  • Someone not respecting your preferred name, or the name of someone close to you. 
  • Someone you know not wanting to pursue a post-secondary education.
  • Your friend doesn't answer your text messages right away.
  • Someone you know choosing to spend their money irresponsibly.
  • Your friends smoke/vape.
  • Someone prepares their food differently.
  • Your friend likes pineapple on their pizza.
  • Someone made fun of another individual's disability. 
  • A friend, family member or partner does not want to get a job. 
  • Someone you know prefers the taste of artificial maple syrup over maple syrup.

Part 4: Wellness Advocacy

In part 4, each branch has a grouping of activities they can complete. Units can choose one or two activities for their branch.

Sparks and Brownies

  1. Finger Painting
    Paint your emotions using paint and only your fingers, share with your unit and describe what you painted.
  2. Share a list of things you can do when you feel sad or upset. Share it with the unit or a family member or friend. Examples could include belly breaths, going for a walk, hugging a favourite toy, etc.
  3. Go for a walk in nature, collect pieces of nature (that are already on the ground!) and create a piece of art.
  4. Make a stress ball or mindfulness jar.
    How to make a stress ball
    How to make a mindfulness jar
  5. What if Everyone
    In this activity, you’ll see how one person’s thoughts and actions can influence the thoughts and actions of others and think about what kind of thoughts and actions you want to spread when it comes to mental health.
  6. Practising Problems
    When it comes to handling a tricky situation or solving a problem, it can be helpful to break it down into smaller steps. This activity is your chance to practice simple and helpful problem-solving steps with situations that might happen in your daily life.
  7. Listening to Your Body
    Listening to our bodies can help us to make healthy choices and get to know ourselves better. Get active and practice listening to what your body is telling you so you know when to push yourself and when not to!

Guides

  1. Finger Painting
    Paint your emotions using paint and only your fingers, share with your unit and describe what you painted.
  2. a) Create a step-by-step plan for what to do when you feel stressed (e.g. grounding techniques) and share it with a family member or friend (create example or template for them to follow). b) Create a playlist for when you feel stressed to help calm you down.
  3. Plan a healthy meal using brain food (e.g. nuts, avocado, beans, etc.).
  4. Make a sleep journal (create template).
    What time did you go to bed?
    How long did you sleep?
    Quality of sleep.
    What do you think helped you sleep better on certain days?
    How can you improve your sleep in the future?
  5. Make a stress ball or mindfulness jar.
    How to make a stress ball
    How to make a mindfulness jar
  6. Building Stronger Health
    It’s time to take another look at your wall of overall health from the starter activity. What have you learned and what skills have you built that are missing from your wall? How can it be stronger?
    Now that you’ve explored mental health, built some positive mental health skills and learned about how you can spread awareness and show your support, wrap up your meeting by making your wall as strong as possible!
  7. One Way Out
    The object of this game is to find your way out of a maze. Think you’ve got what it takes? It may not be as simple as it looks; there’s only one way out and only one correct path to get there. On the path to the finish, you’ll need to use some problem-solving skills and handle setbacks and failure. Rely on your group members and use flexible and positive thinking to succeed!
  8. Find Your Best Balance
    Explore how to keep sleep, step, sweat and sit balanced in your life to feel your best.

Pathfinders

  1. Finger Painting
    Paint your emotions using paint and only your fingers and share your creation on social media using #YFemotionexplosion.
  2. Create a step-by-step plan for what to do when you feel stressed (e.g. grounding techniques) and share it with a family member or friend (create example or template for them to follow).
  3. Stay Hydrated
    Our bodies need water to do many important jobs, like helping us fight off illness, digesting our food, keeping our bodies the right temperature and even going to the bathroom. Dehydration is when we don’t have enough water. Stay hydrated by trying out some of these creative ways to remember to drink water and have fun while you’re doing it.
  4. Make a playlist for when you feel stressed to help calm you down.
  5. Wellness Journal
    Record how you feel at the beginning and end of the day, then add two things you did to make yourself feel happier.
  6. Take A Break Tag (must be done in person)
    How well do you balance physical activity and rest? Do you prefer one over the other? Getting your heart pumping is great for the body, but relaxing is also important. Experiment with this balance by playing a fast-paced game of freeze tag to get your heart pumping, and then trying a breathing exercise to slow things down.
  7. Building Blocks of Health
    This activity is your chance to start talking in a safe, open way about mental health.

Rangers

  1. Finger Painting
    Paint your emotions using paint and only your fingers and share on social media using #YFemotionexplosion.
  2. Create a step-by-step plan for what to do when you feel stressed (e.g. grounding techniques) and share it with a family member or friend (create example or template for them to follow).
  3. Spend the week curating a playlist of your favourite songs that you could play (a) while getting ready in the morning, or (b) as a mood booster. At the end of the week share one of your favourite songs with another member in your unit.
  4. Make a sleep journal (create template).
    Template to include:
    What time you go to bed?
    How long did you sleep?
    Quality of sleep.
    What do you think helped you sleep better on certain days?
    How can you improve your sleep in the future?
  5. Do 30 minutes of exercise every day for a week and an addition 30 minutes of any dynamic activity of your choice.
  6. Rest Up
    We all need rest to keep up with our active lives. Rest can look different depending on who you are and what you like to do. These activities will help you find different kinds of rest that work for you, so you can feel ready for your next active adventure!
  7. Dealing with Disconnection
    How would you feel if you couldn’t go online for a day? How about for a week? Stepping away from devices and technology can cause feelings of stress, also known as disconnection anxiety, for a lot of people – especially when we’re so used to being connected 24/7. Learning strategies for managing these feelings can help you disconnect and take a break from screens more easily. One way to cope with the anxiety or even a lighter case of FOMO (fear of missing out) is by using mindfulness or meditation to reconnect with your surroundings. Give it a try in this disconnected activity.
10/2/2022 12:22:54 AM